Archive for the ‘Jeff Buckley’ Category

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The Art Of Making An Awesome Mix CD

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Nothing is awesomer than an amazing mix CD.  And I came up with an awesome one. At least, for me, it’s awesome. I think it’s an extension of my psyche, and anyone who is just like me should love it too!

Almost all, coincidentally, come from bands I’ve reviewed for my blog, in some form or another.  Of course, it’s not perfect (there’s no such thing as a perfect mix CD – Johnny Banks of Iowa claimed to have made one in 1978, but before it could be heard, it was tragically eaten by his pigs.)

Here is my mix, and beneath the track listing, I will explain why it’s so awesome.

1. “The Bandit” -The Starlight Mints
2. “Triple Fascination” – The Listening
3. “Lazarus” – Porcupine Tree
4. “Tiny Cities Made of Ashes” – Modest Mouse
5. “Here Comes Your Man” – Pixies
6. “So Real” – Jeff Buckley
7. “Flint (For the Unemployed and Underpaid)” – Sufjan Stevens
8. “A Lack of Color” – Death Cab for Cutie
9. “Roads” – Portishead
10. “Untiled” – Sigur Rós
11. “Street Spirit (Fade Out)” – Radiohead
12. “Mexico” – Incubus
13. “Jesus, Etc.” – Wilco
14. “Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity” – Gustav Holst

Now, I will go into the logic behind making a mix CD. Here are some of the basic rules:

1. The mix CD can never stop or end with a lead track or closing track from an album. For example, I could not start this mix CD with “Airbag” off Radiohead’s OK Computer, since that is the lead track from that album. Likewise, I cannot end it with Sonic Youth’s “The Trilogy” off Daydream Nation, since that album ends with that track. Otherwise, it just feels like your listening to that particular album, thus defeating the purpose of a mix CD.

Notice, then, with my track selection, I chose my lead song to be “The Bandit” by the Starlight Mints, which is track two off their album The Dream That Stuff Was Made Of. This was an awesome choice because the song is upbeat and gives energy, enticing the listener to listen further. Only in the rarest of circumstances do you start a mix CD with a slow, soft, or track that’s a downer, but we’ll get to that later.

In a similar vein, I chose my closing track to be “Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity,” by Gustav Holst from his Planets suite. This was a wise choice, because “Jupiter” is in the middle of the suite, yet the piece can also stand on its own. Also, being so glorious sounding makes it conducive to be the ending of a great mix CD, although to some professional CD mixers, this choice might seem a little cliché.  Regardless, it is important to end the mix CD as strong as you started it, if not stronger, in a vainglorious way if at all possible. I am hard-pressed to think of a more epic sounding song than “Jupiter.” (If you haven’t heard it, listen to it! It rocks!)

2. The songs must flow well! Each and every song on my mix CD must blend reasonably well into the next. If you notice my selection above, I would argue that some of my choices are just pure genius, in particular, the transition from Radiohead’s “Street Spirit” into “Mexico.” Both are guitar-picked songs, and both sound like they are in a similar key). By the way, it’s always good for the next song’s first note to either be the same as the previous song’s last note, or at least in the same key. Usually you can tell if you’re ear is good enough – though not necessary, it’s a nice touch.

This also works for similar instruments. Note how strings conclude Wilco’s “Jesus Etc.,” which blends very well into Holst’s strings at the start of “Jupiter. More often than not, a good mix CD has tracks that blend well together, either through similar instruments, keys, distortion, or any other similarity.

3. Having the same two bands in a row is almost always a tacky decision, defeating the purpose of having a mix CD. Similar to this is having two songs from the same band on the mix CD, though you can get away with this more often. If you opt to do this, make sure that these songs showcase different styles for the band. For example, to use Radiohead again as an example, I could pick “Exit Music,” a nice acoustic number by them, and accompany this with “Backdrifts,” a mostly electric song by them using strange chord progressions.

4.  Try not to have all your songs have a similar feel, musicality, or theme. This also defeats the purpose of making a mix CD. The challenge of making an awesome mix CD comes with having plenty of variety form different bands, but still making it flow logically. An exception to this rule is if you’re making a “greatest hits” CD of a certain band, or an eighties themed post-punk CD, or a childhood guilty pleasures CD.

5.  Try to start lighthearted and happy before getting more serious. Try also to end on a light note, so the listener goes away feeling good. It’s the same with writing a book. There needs to be a hook, but it also has to end well or the reader will feel cheated. It’s the same with a great mix CD. Ask yourself: what do I want the listener to feel from the first notes of the first song? And what do I want them to walk away with? Like a good book, save all the heavy conflict, breakups, and drama for the middle. While I didn’t really have the foresight to do it with my mix CD above, try to have songs following your depressing songs that are sort of an answer to them in a positive way, thus making the sun shine over a dark and weary land, so to speak. Notice how in my example of a mix CD, I’ve incorporated all my heavy and depressing songs toward the CD’s middle. Notice how blatantly happy my last track is…I mean, the word “jollity” is in the song’s title! And the happiness of the sickly sweet Starlight Mints song speaks for itself.

6. The sixth rule is the hardest of all – don’t be so rule-bound! If all your mix CD’s follow a formula, than this, too, means that they aren’t a truly mix CDs. There has to be some sort of randomness to it. And keep in mind that once you get better, you’ll learn how to bend and break the rules at the right moments, thus becoming a Mozart or John Coltrane of making mix CDs.

I hope this essay has helped enlighten you on how to make an awesome mix CD. Next time, when you’re at a loss for what to put after that weird TV on the Radio song or just why your mix CD isn’t flowing right, I hope you’ll remember these rules and right your paths on the road of CD mixdom!

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Jeff Buckley – Grace

Sunday, February 22, 2009
Grace (1994)

Grace (1994)

Right now I need a break. I’ve been writing a paper that’s due tomorrow morning at 9:30 a.m., and I’ve only seriously begun to research it a couple hours ago. I almost have enough quotes and info to begin the paper (about tactics during the First Crusade, in case you’re interested, though you’re probably not).

Right now, I’m listening to Arcade Fire’s Neon Bible for the first time and I’m really digging it. Review material sometime in the next two weeks.

Modest Mouse show coming ever closer – hopefully I’m not let down and they remember to play some of the oldies!

Anyway, I would like to take a look at Grace by Jeff Buckley. If you’re reading this review, then chances are you already know and love Jeff Buckley. His only album, Grace, is hailed by many to be a nineties classic. For good reason – it is a nineties classic, and no knowledge of nineties music is complete without at least listening to Grace at least once, recognizing it’s importance.

Though Grace is Buckley’s only album, he probably influenced more artists than anyone else in the nineties. Matt Bellamy of Muse cites his falsetto to be inspired by Buckley. Thom Yorke of Radiohead made the recording for “Fake Plastic Trees,” possibly Radiohead’s saddest song, after hearing Jeff Buckley live. Chris Cornell was close friends with Buckley, and they gave inpsiration to each other. Many other artists cite Grace as a top 5 desert island album.

Then there are some who say it’s highly overrated – that Jeff Buckley had little songwriting ability and had to cover others’ songs, adding his particular flavor with his legendary voice. Bullocks to that. Buckley’s Grace is chocked full of his great original stuff – “Grace,” “Last Goodbye,” “Lover, You Should’ve Come Over, “Eternal Life,” and “Dream Brother.” Each of these songs stands on its own as Buckely’s genius songcraft.

Probably what Grace is most famous for is Buckley’s cover of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.” This is just one of those songs (when sung by Buckley) where you just have to stop and listen, because you are completely powerless not to. I reamember buying Grace and skipping to this track immediately. After one listen, it was over – I put it on repeat and listened to it over and over for a good two hours.

By the time “Hallelujah” had about 30 plays on my iTunes, I decided to expand to the rest of the album, and each of the songs slowly built their play counts to rival “Hallelujah.”

As you can see, Grace shouldn’t just be listened to because it’s important. It is that, but it’s so much more. It’s amazing music, period. It’s a straight-up rock album for the most part, but the songs are highly complicated, using unconvential chords for pop music while retaining a powerful sense of melody. The lyrics are usually deep and sensitive, and though I’m not a girl, the lyrics to “Lover, You Should’ve Come Over” are almost enough to make me swoon.

Songwriting aside, the main trademark of this album is Buckley’s angelic voice (and I don’t say angelic lightly).  It is literally the most beautiful and perfect voice to grace the world of music. It was a shame he died so young.

Grace should be in anyone’s collection. I cannot see anyone not liking this album (even though they’re likely out there).