Posts Tagged ‘Psychedelic Rock’

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The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground & Nico

Sunday, November 25, 2012
The Velvet Underground and Nico (1967)

The Velvet Underground and Nico (1967)

I write this, actually, while listening to Loaded.

I’ll have to admit this took a while for this one to grow on me. It was hard for me to step beyond the dreamy xylophone (that’s what that instrument is, right?) that opens “Sunday Morning.” What a beautiful song. It evokes what Sunday morning is to me – kind of sad day (maybe because Monday is the next day), but strangely peaceful and slow.

Finally, I’ve given it more of a listen, this is quickly becoming one of my favorite albums ever. Not only is it a historic album (punk and noise can trace their beginnings here), but it is a very good album that’s still enjoyable today. Because even today, there is nothing else that quite sounds like it.

This album has some rockers: “Waiting for the Man,” and “Run Run Run,” but it’s the more experimental stuff that I really like. I absolutely adore “Venus in Furs” and its S&M themes (“strike, dear mistress, and cure his heart”). The lyrics are kind of trashy, but it’s the strings, the beat, and the vibe that absolutely makes this song. I’ve never heard anything like it. It gets even darker with “Heroin” but for some reason that song never struck me as much.

At points the album can get slow and sweet, with “I’ll Be Your Mirror” and “All Tomorrow’s Parties”. It gets downright wtf with the closer track “European Son” where it’s an all out noise fest. Sometimes I feel if Sonic Youth had been a band twenty years earlier they would have been a lot like the Velvet Underground.

Yeah…this is a group I’ll have to check out more. Definitely a treasure of the late sixties/early seventies.

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Soundgarden – King Animal

Monday, November 19, 2012
King Animal (2012)

King Animal (2012)

We live in a time where it’s rare to see a straight up “rock” album recorded. We live in the era of space rock, indie rock, folk rock, electro-rock, etc…

That’s what King Animal is: a straight-up, no frills rock album – guitar, bass, drums, and heavy, heavy riffage. In a way, it’s refreshing in simplicity…but in another way, I kind of wish Soundgarden had pushed the envelope.

I was nervous about this for good reason. Soundgarden’s first album in 15-16 years. I had no idea what to expect, and artists are notorious for going to seed in old age. I could see King Animal going one of two ways: Soundgarden sticking to their signature sound of grungy, doomy riffage, or completely surprising everyone with something off the wall.

They decided to go the safe route. This album is a time capsule. Any of these songs could have fit on any of Soundgarden’s other albums. It’s good, it rocks, don’t get me wrong…clearly Kim Thayil hasn’t lost his touch (even if Cornell’s voice is noticeably weaker). But King Animal doesn’t stand out from the rest of their discography. I was really, really interested to see if any more modern music influenced their sound. From the few listens I’ve had, I would say no.

After all, these guys have had sixteen years to learn, grow, and listen to new stuff that might have influenced their current sound. But then again, perhaps the homage they paid to their old sound was a conscious decision. I read somewhere that there was a lot of disappointment with the release Down on the Upside because of a departure from their signature riffage.

Which would be an understandable decision. If fans have been demanding a new Soundgarden album, how cheated would many have felt if they got something un-Soundgarden-esque?

King Animal is a decent album. I just get this inkling that it could have been so much more. Then again, maybe I should just let Soundgarden be Soundgarden, and enjoy what they have offered up – a great rock album and a fitting tribute to their legacy.

Highlights: “Been Away Too Long”, “Blood on the Valley Floor”, “Black Saturday”, “Rowing”

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Porcupine Tree Signify

Sunday, March 28, 2010

Signify (1996)

Last winter, I listened to a lot of Porcupine Tree. I listened to, for the first time, Signify, Lightbulb Sun, and Stupid Dream. Of these, I probably like Signify the best.

I always remember winter when I listen to Signify, mostly because it was the default as I drove to work each day in ice and snow. And it is a suiting winter album.

I think and feel several things when I listen to Signify. The themes are usually bleak, dealing with disconnect and numbness. The lyrics ask haunting questions, such as “Where will be when the future comes?” It expresses discontent and anger toward religion and those use it for power, perhaps even outrightly condemning religion itself.

But musically, this is Porcupine Tree at their best, and they’re at their best quite often. If you’re used to In Absentia or Deadwing era Porcupine Tree, as I was, the style might take some getting used to. After all, it was composed in 1996, six years before In Absentia. But they rock as hard as ever and sound quintessentially Porucpine Tree. This album is host to several classics, such as “Sleep of No Dreaming,” “Sever,” “Idiot Prayer,” and “Dark Matter.”

This is one of those rare albums that’s good from start to finish. The message isn’t very good, expressing bleak discontent and outright negativity that could be depression-inducing at times, aided by the minor key tonality. It is certainly haunting and even creepy at points. But it’s Porcupine Tree and that’s to be expected. Just be aware that the album will deal with dark themes that it doesn’t attempt to answer positively.

Signify is a good album. Porcupine Tree is a highly talented band, and this album is worth a listen, if only for its outstanding musicality.